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Artists’ liveli­hoods in freefall

Government and Arts Council England were praised in the Covid19 emergency for fast imple­men­tation of ad hoc strategies for financial support for arts and cultural insti­tu­tions and job retention schemes for salaried staff. Despite the equality and diversity rhetorics of the funded arts, analysis of responses to the DCMS Inquiry into the Impact of Covid-19 reveal that individual freelance visual artists will suffer worst unless additional remedial actions are taken.

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Treating the rash or investing in a cure: the future of artists’ livelihoods

We cannot be content to go back to what was before, as if all is normal… there needs to be a resur­rection of our common life.” Justin Welby, Archbishop of Canterbury.

The Easter sermon – opined from the Archbishop’s kitchen and dissem­i­nated via social media to some 18,000 people – provided the cue for a discussion on how to ensure artists’ survival in an arts and cultural environment poleaxed by Covid-19

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Artists work in 2016

This Research paper commis­sioned by a‑n The Artists Infor­mation Company is part of a series which first began in 2007 as a means of providing on-going evidence and insight on the context for, and nature of, employment for visual artists. By refer­encing data from prior years, Artists work in 2016 identifies the impli­ca­tions of changes in the condi­tions for artists’ employment and liveli­hoods and proposes some areas for consid­er­ation by those charged with formu­lating policy and measuring the economic and social impact of the arts.

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Ways and means: livelihood strategies 1984 to 2014

This audio presen­tation by Susan Jones at Work and Art, CRATE, UCA Canterbury, March 2015, considers the climate for visual artists’ practice and their artists’ ability to make a living. By refer­encing evidence and data from arts and cultural sources over the last thirty years and consid­ering insight from future forecasting, it identifies prevailing issues surrounding support to artists within the public sector. It concludes by artic­u­lating some of the inherent issues and challenges within the current and future ecology for artists and the contem­porary visual arts that need to be addressed by public funders and the sector alike. 

Read “Ways and means: livelihood strategies 1984 to 2014” in full