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An excep­tional case: visual artists and self-employment

Although 77% of visual artists are regis­tered as self-employed (CCS, 2012), this bald statistic belies the nuance of how liveli­hoods are made up. This short text in the Covid19 portfolio on contex­tu­alises artists’ income sources and concludes with a call for arts funders, arts organ­i­sa­tions and the Higher Education sector to advocate strongly to ensure visual artists receive the support they deserve during the Covid19 emergency and in future. 

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Enforcement, equanimity and an afterword – thoughts on sustaining fair pay for artists

Intro­duction to fees to artists for exhibiting in public with examples indicating that sustaining such schemes is dependent on widespread and continued accep­tance of the principle and rigorous self-regulation within the sector, and on gaining suitable levels of public subsidy to the visual arts. Three financing options are considered in support of equanimity. An afterword considers whether in a political climate of reduced subsidy to the public sector, some new strategies are needed to finance the arts and artists’ contributions.

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Rethinking artists: the role of artists in the 21st Century

This essay for the 2014 Seoul Art Space, Seoul Foundation for Arts and Culture Inter­na­tional Symposium briefly covers UK arts policies for support to artists’ devel­opment, comments on their impact on artists’ social and economic status and suggests a rethinking of the artists’ intrinsic role in society as a vital part of securing and sustaining contem­porary visual arts in the future.

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Bite the hand that feeds you

This provo­cation commis­sioned by Stoke Airspace for an Artists’ Soup Kitchen addresses and confirms the impor­tance of the role and value of artists within cultural and social change. The four sections are designed to open up a discussion on what now?’ and – more impor­tantly – what next?’ for Airspace and artists and future artists located in Stoke.

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Are there too many artists?

This paper used compar­ative data as a backdrop to a commentary designed to illuminate a discussion on whether there are Too many artists?’, raising a range of issues, questions and (mis)perceptions — in part about the role of artists in life in general and impact of state inter­vention and arts policy-making in particular.

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